Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Nature Nerd Wednesdays

Welcome to Nature Nerd Wednesdays, your mid-week nature break to reconnect with the calming, refreshing, and inspiring effects of nature. Take a deep breath and enjoy...

Foxglove and daisies blooming in the Cedar River Watershed, late afternoon in summer 2016. Lainey Piland photo

It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside. ~Maud Hart Lovelace, Betsy-Tacy and Tib, 1941

Summer began yesterday, June 20th! Farewell to the damp days of spring, and welcome to the warmer, drier, long days of summer. The quote above speaks so well to the ambiance of summertime. While it might not smell of roses outdoors (Nootka roses, perhaps...) those in the Pacific Northwest are well acquainted with the heady smell of fir balsam; of alder sap and cottonwood; of warm, damp earth and ripening salmonberries; of a grassy field warmed in the golden sunlight of late afternoon.

These are just a few of the fragrances that perfumed my walk around the neighborhood yesterday afternoon, and how refreshing they are! What smells say "summer" to you?

Blooming fireweed: a sure sign of summer! Lainey Piland photo

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Nature Nerd Wednesdays

Welcome to Nature Nerd Wednesdays, your mid-week nature break to reconnect with the calming, refreshing, and inspiring effects of nature. Take a deep breath and enjoy...

Stormy evening captured from my deck a few years back.

Waves exploding against a rocky shoreline, a windstorm howling through treetops, snakelike tongues of lightning flickering across the sky to the deafening rumble of thunder... we encounter the raw power of nature in many different forms. Those in western Washington may recall the unusually potent thunderstorms that rolled through our region at the end of April.

I just love a stormy day, and these storms were especially vivid for me. That afternoon I'd left work early for an appointment at a nearby hospital. Parked on the roof of the parking garage as was my custom, I looked out over the freeway, over the distant treed hills and was astonished by what I saw as the forefront of the storm approached with a miles-high wall of purple-grey clouds dragging hazy curtains of rain across the landscape as lightning spit from their bellies. It was a transfixing sight. My appointment ended just in time for me to jump in my car and hurry home with the storm close on my heels, then hunker down in my living room as the storm overtook us and illuminated the evening sky with those electric flashes of plasma and window-rattling thunder.

These moments where nature shows its powerful and dangerous side are exhilarating awe-inspiring to witness, when we can watch from a place of safety! And what's safer than experiencing those storms from behind your computer screen, and miles above Earth's surface?  Take a look at the video linked below, featuring that stormy Seattle evening captured by NASA's GOES-16 satellite. (Hint: the entire United States is shown in the frame... hone in on the upper left corner for "our" storm!)


Watching those lighting strikes from a distant perspective really shows just how potent those storms were!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Nature Nerd Wednesdays

Welcome to Nature Nerd Wednesdays, your mid-week nature break to reconnect with the calming, refreshing, and inspiring effects of nature. Take a deep breath and enjoy...

View looking east from the Sauk Mountain trail. Lainey Piland photo

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.
~ John Muir 

This blog is all about connecting people with nature, especially on Nature Nerd Wednesdays.  I think we can all identify with Muir's description above of being the "tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people" of modern society. Whether you're stuck in an office all day, studying in a classroom or are at home caring for a three-week-old baby like I am, the circumstances of our lives can cause us to become separated from the larger natural world "out there" of which we are a part.

Monday this week was World Environment Day, an occasion that occurs on June 5th every year. This year, the theme was "connecting people to nature," a theme that "implores us to get outdoors and into nature, to appreciate its beauty and its importance, and to take forward the call to protect the Earth that we share." Given the current political climate in this country, this ethic is ever more important to develop in each of us.

That's what I'm all about here on A Day Without Rain: encouraging all of us to explore, connect with, and protect the natural environment - whether that connection occurs while we're hiking to remote alpine lakes or strolling around our neighborhoods, or just stopping by the blog for some Nature Nerd Wednesday inspiration.

Lately, my connections with nature have come in the form of creating these blog posts, taking short walks around my neighborhood with a sleeping newborn strapped to my chest... or even listening to the nature and bird sounds play on my son's infant swing as I sit on the floor next to him, as I'm doing right now. Although I live in a typical dense suburban housing development, there is plenty of nature to appreciate on my brief rambles: the rufous and Anna's hummingbirds at the backyard feeder, the violet-green swallows swooping and diving overhead, the cottontails that appear at the edge of the forest across the street from my house every evening to browse the green grass, the bumblebees buzzing in the lavender outside my front door, the blooming thimbleberry and ripening salmonberries in the undisturbed natural remnants that remain tucked behind rows of cookie-cutter homes. Small things though they may be, they are "fountains of life" indeed for this nerve-shaken new mom.

Another good way to connect with nature when you can't actually get outside? Taking a short break with one of the fabulous daily Nature 365 films by Jim Brandenburg. Take a look:



The connections are all around. How do you find them?